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Entries in Philadelphia Musicians (16)

11:07PM

NEW Updated Version: - Friends and Colleagues

3:59PM

JOHNNY SAINT - Tribute To A Friend & Colleague


John Fiedler “Johnny Saint” passed away on November 17, 2014  

Loving Husband of Evelyn (nee Malask). Father of Steven (Patricia), Michael (the late Kathleen), and Daniel (Svetlana). Loving brother of William (Mary) and the late Sr. M. Rosalita CSSF . Devoted “Deeda” of Rebecca, and Alex. Grandfather to Judy (Don) and great-grandfather to Holly, “Poppop” to his many nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to his Memorial Gathering on Monday November 24, 2014 from 6:30 to 8:30PM at McCafferty Funeral and Cremation Inc. 6711 Frankford Ave. Philadelphia PA. 19135 (between Unruh & Knorr Sts.) 215-624-4200. There will be a prayer Service in the funeral home at 8:30PM. In lieu of flowers please make donations  in John’s Memory to the American Cancer Society 1626 Locust St. Philadelphia PA.19103.

For More Information:

http://funeralhomesinphiladelphia.com/service-times/

 

JOHNNY SAINT (Drummer & Business Manager) Was an excellent musician from Philadelphia who was the backbone of the popular Musical & Vocal recording combo named  "The Unique Joyriders." This group traveled Internationally during the 1950s through the 1970s playing the Golden Oldies, Favorite Vocal Harmony Standard Songs in addition to popular instrumental big band arrangements that were on the Billboard charts. They shared the bandstand opposite many top name recording artists including Lionel Hampton, Joey Dee & The Starliters, The Temptations, Mike Pedicin, Bill Haley & The Comets, The Platters, Bo Diddley and other leading show places and musical lounges plus New Yorks' Famous “Peppermint Lounge." Their recording of “After You’ve Gone” made the Billboard Charts and launched many more appearances performing to SRO audiences throughout the USA & Canada.

 

 

3:55AM

TONY ANGELO - A MEMORIAM FOR A FRIEND & COLLEAGUE

 

Born: September 29, 1944

Died: March 30, 2014

Tony Angelo (aka) Angelo Cibotti – was a talented entertainer and musician from the South Philadelphia section of the “City of Brotherly Love.” 

Tony . . . as everyone knew him shared the entertainment stages of many major showrooms & bandstands from the East and West coast throughout the USA in addition to International showrooms of Canada and El San Juan, Puerto Rico.

He was an excellent Saxophonist that played alto, tenor, baritone plus clarinet. His performing career in music of more than 40 years consisted as a sideman, leader of small combos that shared the Las Vegas marquees of Caesars’ Palace, MGM Grand which included "Kirby Stone and Company, Pat Gallo Revue," and various other headline performers throughout the 1950’s to 1980’s. During this time in his career gave him the opportunity to be associated with many other musicians, lounge performers that included Louis Prima and Sam Butera & the Witnesses, Freddie Bell & the Bellboys and others. He also operated a successful talent agency that provided bookings for other musicians and entertainers on the East coast.

My friendship with Tony began in the late 1970’s. Throughout our many conversations, it was brought to my attention that we were basically from the same section of South Philly and had many mutual friends in the music business. We often discussed and reflected upon the many nightclubs in the Philadelphia area such as: Palumbo’s Supper Club owned by Frank Palumbo, the original Latin Casino, Club 13 and The Earle Theater that featured “Live” Big Bands of the decades also The Famous "500 Club" owned by our mutual friend Paul ‘Skinny’ D’Amato plus other venues throughout the Delaware Valley and other major cities.

Searching my archives I was able to locate an unreleased video recording of his last performance with “The Angel & Angelo Revue with Andy Angel, trumpet and Tony Angelo sax. This was a vocal duet tribute segment of their show featuring a Louis Prima Medley, featuring their musical swing arrangement of favorite popular standard songs. “It had to be you” – When Your Smiling” – “Pennies from Heaven” – “Oh Marie.”

Sharing this short video clip in remembrance to his musical talent as a saxophonist,

I believe Tony was a true professional. 

 

A huge part of Tony Angelo’s life was helping others especially children, to learn about music and what the difference it can make in their lives.  I lieu of flowers and mass cards, any donations would be welcomed in Tony Angelo ( a.k.a. ) Angelo Cibotti’s name.

His favorite charity is the Music Department of Assumption Regional Catholic School for the advancement of helping children learn about music.


Address for donations:

ARCS ( Assumption Regional Catholic School ) 

146 South Pitney Road

Galloway, NJ 08205

Attn: Cathy Flammer

*Checks made out to ARCS*

Click

 

              The Services will be on:  Sunday May 25th, 2014

1pm to 2 pm Visitation.  2pm to 3pm Services. 

                                             Wimberg Funeral Home  -  Galloway, NJ 08205     

 

12:12AM

Johnny Saint - "The Joyriders" - Part I - *A Country Walk Back Home* Instrumental

 "A COUNTRY WALK BACK HOME"  

The inspiration to compose this original melody came about one evening while I was  having a casual meeting with longtime friend and musician, drummer Johnny Saint. We casually reflected about the many cities and nightclubs & musical lounges that we worked through the years. Traveling the east and west coasts of the United States plus the many appearances across the border into various sections of Canada. 

“The Joyriders”

“The Joyriders” consisted of a swinging 5-piece combo from thes Philadelphia with a large fan club throughout the Delaware Valley on the East Coast. This group was headed by Johnny Saint,(drums) and close friends from the surrounding area of the city of Philadelphia . . . which included Tony Dell,(keyboards)-Joe Mallace,(guitar)- Rocky Angelo,(bass) , that paved the way for various Sax-men from Philly. These excellent reedmen included Nick Carl, Don Russell, Armand Saviano, Bobby Borda, and Dom Albano. The vocal expertise and musicianship was featured in all of their material from the current Top 10 Hits of the day to various Jazz arrangements that gave each member a solo spotlight at each and every performance.

I was fortunate to join the group in the mid-1960s after I departed “The Frank Virtue & the Virtues Revue.” Most of the members of “The Joyriders” were from the same Philadelphia neighborhood and enjoyed the same type of music from Rhythm & Blues, Classic Rock & Roll and JAZZ.  With this in mind, the experimental boundaries and musical input from each member at every performance was enjoyed by the audiences throughout the country.

While we spoke about the many cities we had traveled in the past. -  I played a demo tape of my instrumental composition “A Country Walk Back Home” that was dedicated to miles of travel through the years. As a drummer . . . I needed his input for a recording session, his creativity and spontaneous rhythm was shared by all during the session.

Synopsis:

(Produced and composed at IEA Recording Studios in the mid-70s - I was able to secure the talents of my friends that have recorded for major labels in the past. Even though, the saxophone is featured as the solo instrument. The rhythm section is tightly led by my friend Johnny Saint who devised a swinging touch of a two-beat rhythm tempo - which many people enjoyed dancing too at every performance.)

 In the following Chapters:

I also would like to recap some of

Johnny Saint’s memorable moments of his career in music.

Chapter 1

Looking back over more than 35 years in the music business . . .I realize what a blessing it was to be able to play an instrument as a drummer. - To be able to make a living at it is even sweeter. It is the only job that you would do for no pay, just to have the chance to play.

Johnny SaintFORT PITT- Atlantic CityMy group was called “The Joyriders” and from 1959 to 1963 I would play at Atlantic City’s “Fort Pitt” musical lounge located on New York Avenue & the Boardwalk from 10:00 pm to 3:00am.  After we completed our work schedule, our band and some friends all visited the famous Club Harlem located on what was known as “Kentucky & the Curb” where Chris Colombo & his band alternated with saxophonist Willis “Gator Tail” Jackson’s band until 5:00am. Then it was off to Rocky Castillani’s club at Missouri & Atlantic Avenues to play more music.


That point reminds me of the mornings I spent listening to some of the best music I ever heard at “Rocky’s” Bar that was owned by former middleweight boxer Rocky Castellani in Atlantic City.  The house band was an organ trio but by 4:00am . . . it became a Jazz Open House that featured visiting musicians from the surrounding seashore areas of Somers Point & Wildwood, New Jersey. During this time it would be possible to see, hear and enjoy as many as 10 or more musicians on the bandstand taking part of a swinging Jam Session that would last until the early morning hours of daylight.

Reflecting back to the age of five years old, my first interest in music was when I would listen to a Fat’s Waller radio show as I ate my lunch every day.

I liked the melodies being played, but I was more interested in the tempos and how it all meshed together with the other instruments. At an early age, when I began taking drum lessons at Wurlitzer’s Music store located at 10th and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia, PA . . . I honestly believed I was destined to be a musician. At the age of 14, I played my first job in a neighborhood bar, with a trio consisting of accordion, banjo and myself on the drums. I made $10.00 each night for Friday and Saturday weekend. I was hooked.

I also remember that on the second floor of Wurlitzer’s Music Store there was a free open space that was available for Jam Sessions every Tuesday Night to visiting musicians working within the Philadelphia area with other traveling Big Bands. Whoever was in town would stop by and play for this Jazz Open House.

One night there was Horace Silver, Chet Baker, and Zoot Sims all on the bandstand at once. One night a 15year old young man sat in and played his trumpet and blew everyone away . . . his name was Lee Morgan who later became a leading Jazz trumpeter and composer with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. 

  *<> * (More interesting material in upcoming future Chapters)

 

12:51AM

STAN ROSS - Special Comment For Joe Fortunato

 My friend Stan Ross forwarded this photo from his archives -

Ray Fern - Joe Fortunato and Stan (himself-circ. 1974)


"I had the privilege of sharing the bandstand with Joe; he was "HOT." 

 "When the smoke cleared, you knew it was from him.  That is why I called him "Smokin' Joe Fortunato."

                                                  "We miss ya Big Guy!"

                                    Stan Ross