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Entries in Philadelphia Four Brothers (6)

9:17PM

JOE FORTUNATO - MEMORIAL TRIBUTE - Playing "Out Of Nowhere"

 

 

Recently we have been having many requests from many friends and fans of Joe Fortunato for a recording of a popular song from

The American Songbook entitled “Out of Nowhere”

 >>   May 5, 1930 - October 28, 2011  <<

As a Memorial Tribute . . . I have located this recording plus various instrumental tracks recorded from a local Philadelphia studio . . . that was never released publicly, but was always requested at every club date and live performance from Joe Fortunato.  

The sharing of this duo recording by Joe Fortunato & Lou Gagliardi by exemplifies his soulful approach to the tenor saxophone with the tasteful guitar accompaniment of longtime friend Lou Gagliardi.

 

 

3:32AM

Joe Fortunato - Memorable Tribute to a friend

Joe Fortunato was a Jazz legend in the Philadelphia music scene for over 70 years. A true Gentleman of Jazz. His contribution to Jazz has always lived-up to the old standard song title cliché

“It Don’t Mean a Thing . . . If It Ain’t Got That Swing.”

Joe was Born: May 5, 1930 and died of natural causes on October 28, 2011.

He was born and raised in South Philadelphia area "The City of Brotherly Love" along with other notable musicians within this close-knit neighborhood part of town. Joe also had a friendly relationship with another jazz saxophonist who was a few years older; his name was Charlie Ventura, and his brothers Benny and Ernie Ventura, who also were musicians within a small radius of city blocks of South Philadelphia.

Joe’s inspiration to Jazz and Big Band music was when he listened to a late night disc jockey on WIBG-AM a Philadelphia station hosted by Doug Arthur when he played a recording by tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins’ classic jazz rendition of the popular song “Body and Soul.”

Video includes a duet live recording of "Body & Soul" by Joe Fortunato and his friend jazz guitarist Lou Gagliardi.   

 

                             


12:51AM

STAN ROSS - Special Comment For Joe Fortunato

 My friend Stan Ross forwarded this photo from his archives -

Ray Fern - Joe Fortunato and Stan (himself-circ. 1974)


"I had the privilege of sharing the bandstand with Joe; he was "HOT." 

 "When the smoke cleared, you knew it was from him.  That is why I called him "Smokin' Joe Fortunato."

                                                  "We miss ya Big Guy!"

                                    Stan Ross


1:27PM

FAVORITE RECORDINGS - Gene Ammons - "Two Different Worlds" 

  Since JAZZ is a culmination of various styles from Swing, Be-Bop, Rhythm & Blues, and Melodic Soulful Moods from the voice of a musician. I feel that it is necessary in "Passing The Baton" and share some of these audio samples in hopes to give insight to the Spontaneous, Improvisational, & Reflective shadings to the musical concept of JAZZ.

Please Note: Within the coming weeks I will be posting more Favorite Recordings that I have been fortunate to have in my collection throughout my career. Featuring Straightahead to Mainstream Saxophonists, Big Bands, Vocalists, and other musicians  that have been an inspiration to me through the years. From listening to these consumate professionals, I know that I have learned a great deal about our "American Art Form" called Jazz. 

"TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS"

Written by Al Frisch & Sid Wayne

"The Soulful Moods of Gene Ammons"

is an album by saxophonist Gene Ammons recorded in 1962

and released on the Moodsville label

 

GENE AMMONS

Bom April 14, 1925 - Chicago, IL  -  Died August 6,1974 - Chicago, IL
The son of famed jazz pianist Albert Ammons, he studied music at Du Sable High School in Chicago. At the early age of 18 he left Chicago to join a band led by trumpeter King Kolax. During 1944 he joined Billy Eckstine's band as lead tenor saxophonist. A few years later he had the opportunity to work with Woody Herman's band for a brief time.
Joining forces with his longtime friend saxophonist Sonny Stitt, their sax battles on the bandstand are remembered as the most exciting performances ever. Although his approach to playing the tenor saxophone has been influenced by Lester Young, he was noted for the big well-rounded sound that has been recognized for its smooth lush and tasteful quality. His tastefulness in playing a ballad has a distinctive style of feeling and improvisation that will never be duplicated.

 

2:45AM

CLEF NOTE - "SPOTLIGHTS" - Vol. #4

 Searching through our Mr. Nick’s archive collection of memorabilia, this interesting piece of information was brought to our attention.  My friend and colleague Larry Bennett often spoke about his working association with his friend Joe Glaser owner of ASSOCIATED BOOKING CORPORATION (ABC), which represented Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday and many top Jazz artists through the past decades.  

 

– One time a while ago, Larry also mentioned that he had a conversation with Horace Silver regarding a popular jazz standard tune named “The Preacher” that he wrote while he was with the Jazz Messengers. Horace Silver explained that it was written with the basic chord structure of a popular folk song called “Show Me the Way to Go Home,” which was written as far back as 1925 by a British songwriting team of James Campbell and Reginald Connelly.
During the late 1950s, Horace Silver recorded “The Preacher” for Blue Note Records. It became one of the biggest hits for the Blue Note label. 
Alfred Lion, owner of Blue Note was reluctant to record the song.  Since then “The Preacher” has been used as sound tracks for many films and other productions.  

 

Searching through our Mr. Nick’s archive collection of memorabilia, this interesting piece of information was brought to our attention.  My friend and colleague Larry Bennett often spoke about his working association with his friend Joe Glaser owner of ASSOCIATED BOOKING CORPORATION (ABC), which represented Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday and many top Jazz artists through the past decades. (Jazz Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow) – One time . . .a while ago, Larry also mentioned that he had a conversation with Horace Silver regarding a popular jazz standard tune named “The Preacher” that he wrote while he was with the Jazz Messengers. Horace Silver explained that it was written with the basic chord structure of a popular folk song called “Show Me the Way to Go Home,” which was written as far back as 1925 by a British songwriting team of James Campbell and Reginald Connelly. During the late 1950s, Horace Silver recorded “The Preacher” for Blue Note Records. It became one of the biggest hits for the Blue Note label. Alfred Lion, owner of Blue Note was reluctant to record the song.  Since then “The Preacher” has been used as sound tracks for many films and other productions.  

Stan Ross

 

 In Mr. Nick’s archive collection, I have found a live recording date of “The Preacher”  (audio) played by The Stan Ross Quartet during the 1970s. Hope you enjoy this short segment of the masterful approach and sound from Stan Ross on tenor saxophone.